A Book of Celtic Wisdom

Prologue with evening light filtered through a prism

Since I’ve moved I don’t take packages and have limited mail at my apartment. The reason is threefold:

– My mailbox is crap.
– I never know when I’ll be home to receive packages.
– I don’t trust anything left in the alley.

So whenever I go to my moms, there’s often some used cd, videogame or book waiting for me. Sunday was no exception, but I couldn’t recall anything I’d ordered directly from Amazon.

Opening it revealed a book, and I immediately knew who it was from. I sat there with my mom on the couch and gleaned through the chapters with titles like:

– Solitude is Luminous
– Death as the Root of Fear
– Autumn and the Inner Harvest
– The Mystery of Friendship

This is very much like any number of books that we had on the shelves growing up. Had my mom lived more toward a coast, she’d have likely been a hippy—the tree hugging kind, not the twirling around on acid kind.

All that Ram Dass, Ramtha and Shirley MacClaine seeps in as a child. If anything, just by reading the dust jackets and sorting through the basic themes.

The most heartening facet of all this, is the desire to learn and grow is a part of me. I’m reminded that I need not be stuck for too long.

I’m looking forward to this read. It came at a time when all the fiction and computer books I’m consuming isn’t enough.

*tips hat in a westerly direction*

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Flatiron

The cigar specials at the Flatiron

Everyone was out of the office for the most part up in Columbus. I’d no reason to be there, but it afforded me the ability to focus on the mounting tasks at hand.

I strolled down the street to the Flatiron for a Black and Bleu salad— pretty much a steak cut up and blackened on top of greens with roasted tomatoes and peppers. A favorite of mine.

Other than that, I found myself reading the book How to Be Alone: Essays by Jonathan Franzen. The cover and blurb spoke to me, and I picked it up, mildly amused that the author refused to be a part of Oprah’s book club. Too early to tell how it’s going to be overall, but his style is pleasant and thoughts insightful.

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The bookshelf is sagging

Much appreciated

Print is far from dead. As nice as it is to put my paws on a PowerBook, it’s hard to beat the tactile nature of a real book.

They don’t require batteries either.

I’ve got a pile on the coffee table and bedside that I haven’t dug into proper. I figure I’ll be able to get a few tackled during some long flights.

  • Paint by Number William L. Bird, Jr. (The source of the image above)
    A trip down memory lane. Well crafted and designed to boot. I’m trying to think if there are any recent crafty crazes (aside from "scrapbooking") that inspires folks to turn off the tube and use unearthed artistic talents.

  • A Home at the End of the World Michael Cunningham
    The author of The Hours coupled with mini-review by Bitbear was all I needed to pick this up as a travel companion.
  • The Protectors Dave Brown
    Cowboy serial smut I’ve been following, however this one is tougher to get into because there’s this strange twist of time travel mixed in with the man love.
  • Coming into the Country John McPhee
    Another recommendation that is a pleasure to read, also going in the travel bag.
  • Peanuts – The Art of Charles Shultz Edited by Chip Kidd
    The upcoming Peanuts books, brought to my attention by Rootbeer1, made me take pause as I passed the humor section in the store. Not what I was looking for, but what a wonderfully designed piece. Moments before I was wondering what Chip Kidd was up to (a great book jacket designer most famous for the Jurassic Park logo)
  • Designing with Web Standards Jeffery Zeldman
    This is a great introduction to the different "standards" facing developers and designers. I haven’t gotten into it far enough to prove its worth, but it seems to be the most valuable of the (techincal) bunch. Plus, it was 30% off at Barnes and Noble. Discount = good.
  • Cascading Style Sheets: The Definitive Guide O’Reilly
    More for reference than for reading. It will go on the shelf at the studio.
  • HTML for the World Wide Web with XHTML and CSS Elizabeth Castro
    I enjoy the approachability of the Visual Quickstart Guides. This one seems the most rudimentary, but again, it’s nice to have on the shelf when noggin scratching.
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Storytelling at the theater

An evening with David Sedaris

Went with Wendy, Tom and Anne to see David Sedaris speak. We found ourselves dressed more casual than most at the Taft Theater, electronic tickets in hand for an evening of readings, mostly new it seemed.

Aside from the dry wit and sometimes grotesque or bittersweet stories, it was nice to get a peek at the process behind his work during a question and answer session that followed.

His 30 city tour in 31 days allows him to hear the stories and correct alliteration, refining and editing in the evening. He held a pencil in his hand and undoubtedly made markings behind the podium through the set.

The thought of making something “work” on paper as a vocation seemed intriguing.

More remarkable however, is his ability to go off on tangents that provide insight to himself and those around him.

His description of an afternoon with his sister (no, not the one from Strangers with Candy) struck me as particularly poignant. It started off-color, about the etiquette of talking on the phone while in the can, and ended up being a powerful reflection on how we judge actions and each other.

I could try and recount it, but I’m sure the book will be a lot better.

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